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10 Best Tried and True Japanese Frying Pans in 2022 (Culinary Researcher-Reviewed)

10 Best Tried and True Japanese Frying Pans in 2022 (Culinary Researcher-Reviewed)

Have you ever struggled with frying pans that are supposed to be non-stick, but you keep burning your food, no matter what you do? Having a reliable frying pan can help make cooking much easier. With a multitude of uses, everything from making stir-fries and pasta to pancakes and omelets, the humble frying pan can be used to make just about anything. Japanese frying pans are incredibly reliable, versatile, and easy to maintain. Yet there are so many different brands and materials to choose from, it becomes difficult to know what the best Japanese frying pan is!


Our editors searched Japanese e-commerce sites like Amazon, Rakuten, and Yahoo! Shopping for the best Japanese frying pans and put them all to the test! 


We tested each frying pan for the following:

  1. How little food sticks to the frying pan
  2. How well the frying pan conducts heat
  3. How evenly the frying pan distributes heat
  4. How light the frying pan is
  5. How easy it is to hold the handle

So just which Japanese frying pans will stand out above the rest? Use this guide as a reference to help you make your decision before purchasing. 

Last updated 2023/01/12
Expert
Culinary Researcher
Akiko Kazama

After working at an Italian restaurant for six years, Akiko Kazama changed careers and began working at a cooking school before going independent. Akiko then helped launch cafes, catered for events, and supervised cooking for online media outlets and magazines. In 2013, she established her own cooking school, Kitchen Studio Ningyocho Kitchen, which primarily focuses on home cooking. In recent years, she has been active as an expert in taste testing, cooking utensils, and cooking appliances, and is familiar with a broad range of fields related to food.

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The experts featured in these contents reviewed the contents of the buying guide.
Products or services listed have been independently ranked by the mybest Editorial Team based on the relevant research as of 11-04-2022. Experts featured in this article did not participate in the selection and ranking process.

How to Choose a Frying Pan

Before purchasing a frying pan, we would like you to consider the following points. We also included some information about how to store and take care of your pan to get the best out of it.

① Choose Based on Coating and Potential Life Span

Choose Based on Coating and Potential Life Span

Most frying pans are manufactured with a coating that prevents food from sticking to the surface. You see a lot of frying pans coated with either Teflon or a fluorine resin, making them much more resistant to scratches and damage. 


However, no coating lasts forever, and each type of coating offers different pros and cons.

Fluorine Resin Processing isn't Resistant to Heat or Friction

Fluorine Resin Processing isn't Resistant to Heat or Friction

One of the most common types of coating found on aluminum frying pans is a fluorine resin coating, otherwise known as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).


Fluorine resin is actually a soft material that's prone to scratching, making it not the most durable material out there. In order to compensate for fluorine resin's lack of durability, manufacturers have added diamond particles as well as marble particles, which are materials known for their hardness, which are referred to as diamond or marble coatings, which are best for those who want the coating on their pans to last longer.


In recent years, fluorine resin blended with titanium, a material that is resistant to corrosion from acids and salt, known as titanium coating, is becoming increasingly popular.

Akiko Kazama
Culinary Researcher
Akiko Kazama's Comment

Fluorine resin-coated pans are relatively easy to find and are also easy to handle. 


On the other hand, as mentioned above, they're not the most resilient to heat and friction, so stay away from using metal spatulas, using high heat, or heating it up with nothing in the pan.

② Teflon Coating is Categorized into Five Ranks

Teflon Coating is Categorized into Five Ranks

While Teflon-coated pans are common, Teflon is actually a type of fluororesin coating. In fact, Teflon is simply a type of fluororesin coating which has been trademarked by the American company The Chemours Company (formerly DuPont).


However, where Teflon coating is different from your standard fluororesin coating is the fact that there are five ranks, which vary depending on the materials and thickness of each layer: Basic, Select, Select-Premium, Platinum, and Platinum Pro. The higher the rank, the more expensive they become, but also the more durable.


Usually, manufacturers will label what rank Teflon coating the pan uses on the package, so take a look when buying a new frying pan.

Ceramic Coating is Durable, but Harder to Handle

Ceramic Coating is Durable, but Harder to Handle

The latest innovation in frying pan coating material is ceramic. While fluorine resin coatings can only withstand up to roughly 280℃ (536°F), ceramic can withstand around 400℃ (752°F), meaning that even if your pan gets too hot, the coating is less likely to come off.


Additionally, ceramic is much harder than fluorine resin and therefore tends to be more durable. However, they're not resistant to impact and can chip easily, so handle them with care. On top of that, you can quickly burn your food if you don't use enough oil.

③ Choose Based on Size and Weight

Choose Based on Size and Weight

Frying pans run in a number of sizes, ranging from 4 to 12 inches, so choose the one that best suits your cooking needs and household size. 


We also found that the weight of your frying pan will have a large effect on how easy it is to use. Being able to deftly flip and stir your ingredients is important, so try not to purchase a pan that's too heavy.


Even those of you who tend not to make dishes that require constant flipping and stirring will notice the importance of a lightweight pan when washing it, as you'll be able to do so easily while holding it with just one hand.

④ Find an Aluminum Bottom for Unsurpassed Thermal Conductivity

Find an Aluminum Bottom for Unsurpassed Thermal Conductivity

Most frying pans are made of either aluminum, iron, or stainless steel.


Among those choices, aluminum pans have the best thermal conductivity and are available at a range of different prices, so you'll be able to choose one that best suits your budget. And if you can find one with a decent coating, you'll be able to cook easily with it as well as wash it with little to no stress at all. 


Stainless steel pans, are slow to heat up, but they also are slower to cool down, making them great for dishes that you want to keep the heat on for long as well as dishes that you finish off with residual heat. Stainless steel pans are also heavier than aluminum frying pans.


There are some pans that are made from a combination of stainless steel and aluminum to take advantage of the benefits of both materials!


On the other hand, for those of you out there who take cooking seriously, you'll want to choose a frying pan that best suits your recipe needs. 

 

10 Best Japanese Frying Pans

Now to introduce the 10 best Japanese frying pans available online.
Products
Image
Click to purchase
Points
1

Kohnan

LIFELEX Frying Pan

Kohnan LIFELEX Frying Pan 1枚目

A Lightweight Frying Pan With a Great Non-Slip Grip

2

Bestco

Phylite IH Frying Pan

Bestco Phylite IH Frying Pan 1枚目

A Pan With Minimal Hot or Cold Spots

3

Kyocera

Cerabrid® Frying Pan

Kyocera Cerabrid® Frying Pan 1枚目

Quick to Heat With Even Distribution, but Not the Most Durable

4

Urushiyama

Moderno Fry Pan

Urushiyama Moderno Fry Pan 1枚目

Even Heat Distribution and Great Heat Retention

5

Keyuka

Timant II IH Frying Pan

Keyuka Timant II IH Frying Pan 1枚目

A Great Pan for Stir-Fries

6

Iris Ohyama

Diamond Coated Frying Pan

Iris Ohyama Diamond Coated Frying Pan 1枚目

A Quick-Heating Japanese Frying Pan

7

Hokuriku Aluminum

Senren Cast Frying Pan

Hokuriku Aluminum Senren Cast Frying Pan 1枚目

Even Heat Distribution but Awkward Handle

8

Teleken

Flavor Stone Sauté Pan

Teleken Flavor Stone Sauté Pan 1枚目

Even Heat Distribution, but Not So Durable

9

Pearl Metal

Super Blue Marble Light IH-Compatible Frying Pan

Pearl Metal Super Blue Marble Light IH-Compatible Frying Pan 1枚目

An Incredibly Lightweight and Easy-to-Manage Pan

10

Hokuriku Aluminum

Meister 2-Layer Clad Frying Pan

Hokuriku Aluminum Meister 2-Layer Clad Frying Pan 1枚目

Overall Good Non-Stick, but Difficult to Hold

Product details
Close
No.1

A Lightweight Frying Pan With a Great Non-Slip Grip

Kohnan's LIFELEX frying pan is an original design by the company, based on the needs and wants of their female staff. With a stylish wood-like handle, this pan would easily fit into any fashionable kitchen.

This frying pan ranked highly in terms of how lightweight it was and how easy the handle was to grip. At only roughly 21 ounces, this pan is easy to use even for the elderly. We also liked how the handle didn't slip at all.

Even after significant wear and tear, we could easily remove our egg with the help of a spatula. As for evenness in heat distribution and conductivity, we found that the sides were not as quick to heat up compared to the center, but it was within an acceptable range and didn't negatively affect our cooking.

This product is definitely worth considering if you're looking for an easy-to-use frying pan.

No.2

A Pan With Minimal Hot or Cold Spots

Bestco's Phylite IH Frying Pan is coated with a premium-grade fluororesin coating and has passed a friction resistance test of 2 million scratches with a metal spatula. The exterior of the pan has a mirrored finish, allowing it to blend in with any kitchen.


We particularly liked how evenly this frying pan distributed heat, with very little difference in temperature between the center and the sides of the pan. Additionally, we liked how the center of the handle is tapered, making it easy to grip.


However, we did find that in our non-stick test, our egg got stuck on the surface of the pan and was difficult to remove smoothly, costing it points.

No.3

Quick to Heat With Even Distribution, but Not the Most Durable

Kyocera's Cerabrid® Frying Pan is coated with a hard ceramic coating and can be cleaned with a melamine sponge. Kyocera claims that this pan heats food with far-infrared rays which trap in the flavors of your food.


In our heat distribution test, we found that it was able to evenly distribute heat well. When new, it was fantastically non-stick, allowing us to move our egg around without even having to use a spatula. We also liked how it only took about 5 minutes to boil water, suggesting that this pan heats up quickly.


However, after taking some sandpaper to the pan, we found that our egg stuck to the center, meaning this frying pan isn't the most durable. We also found that while the pan weighs roughly 30 lbs, the handle was pretty narrow, making the pan feel heavier than the weight would suggest.

No.4

Even Heat Distribution and Great Heat Retention

Urushiyama's Moderno Frying Pan is made of cast aluminum. The bottom of the pan is relatively thick and heats evenly without cooling off too quickly.

During our heat distribution test, we found that the center of the pan was slightly hotter than the edges, but it was relatively even. The eggs peeled off smoothly and there were no burnt pieces leftover when we cooked it right after purchase.

However, after some wear, the eggs ended up sticking a lot. We also found that the handle girth was relatively skinny, making it hard to hold.

No.5

A Great Pan for Stir-Fries

Keyuka's Timant II IH Frying Pan features a coating made with diamond particles, which the manufacturer claims is compatible with metal spatulas, excluding those that are particularly sharp.

While the anti-stick coating was not as good as the higher-ranking frying pans, we could easily remove our eggs with the help of a spatula. The coating was long-lasting and didn't change much even after rubbing it with sandpaper.

The handle is oval in shape and has a good width, giving us a strong sense of stability when held. Since it is pretty lightweight, we felt that this pan was extremely suitable for stir-fries and fried rice. However, since it took approximately 5 minutes 43 seconds for our water to reach boiling temperature, it isn't the quickest in terms of heating up, so that led to a slight loss in points.

No.6

Iris OhyamaDiamond Coated Frying Pan

$84.97

A Quick-Heating Japanese Frying Pan

Iris Ohyama's Diamond Coated Frying Pan has a thick bottom layer that gradually gets thinner on the sides, leading to a surprisingly lightweight product. It's claimed to have gone through a wear resistance test of more than 50 thousand times by the manufacturer.

At an astonishing weight of 25 ounces, this pan is extremely easy to cook with. The handle is firm and has a good thickness that supports the pan well. The heat conduction was also really good so we would recommend this product for those who prefer cooking quickly.

Unfortunately, after the sandpaper test, our eggs started to get stuck to the center of the pan. The center of the pan also recorded a higher temperature than the sides during our heat unevenness test.

No.7

Even Heat Distribution but Awkward Handle

Hokuriku Aluminum's Senren Cast Frying Pan is treated with a Teflon Platinum Plus surface coating. This pan is made of cast aluminum with a thick bottom and thinner sides, which the manufacturer claims to balance lightness and durability.

After some wear, our eggs started to get slightly stuck to the surface, but this wasn't too stressful, as we were able to easily remove them with a spatula. The handle was big and felt stable, but didn't fit the best in our hands as it wasn't very ergonomic.

It took 5 minutes and 47 seconds for our water to boil, which wasn't the best score for our heat conductivity test. It was able to heat relatively evenly, but the edges didn't seem to get very hot.

No.8

TelekenFlavor Stone Sauté Pan

$51.99

Even Heat Distribution, but Not So Durable

Teleken's Flavor Stone Sauté Pan claims to utilize infrared rays generated from ceramics to help keep your food juicy and flavorful. The base has 3 layers while the top has another 3, which leads to a 6 layer pan that is anti-stick and cooks evenly.

We were able to cook and remove our eggs easily when it was new, but after some wear, there were more and more areas where our eggs would stick to the pan.

The pan heated up evenly overall, and the thick, rounded handle fit easily into our hands and helped give us a firm, stable grip.

No.9

Pearl MetalSuper Blue Marble Light IH-Compatible Frying Pan

$24.46

An Incredibly Lightweight and Easy-to-Manage Pan

Pearl Metal's Super Blue Marble Light IH-Compatible Frying Pan features 6 layers of coating on the inside


When it was new, we were able to remove our egg with no stress, but after wearing it down, we found that our egg stuck all over the pan, ruining our thinly cooked egg. We also found that the edges of the pan didn't get as hot as the center.


However, while the handle was on the slimmer side, it was well-balanced with the weight of the actual pan itself, making it easy to hold. Weighing a svelte 22.8 lbs, this frying pan is best for cooking dishes that require a lot of pan movement.

No.10

Hokuriku AluminumMeister 2-Layer Clad Frying Pan

$50.55

Overall Good Non-Stick, but Difficult to Hold

As the name implies, Hokuriku Aluminum's Meister 2-Layer Clad Frying Pan is made from stainless steel and aluminum layered on top of each other. The inside of the pan is coated with a Teflon Platinum coating.


When new, while we found some burnt pieces, overall we were able to remove our egg neatly. After wearing it down, we were able to remove the egg with a spatula, but it got stuck everywhere on the pan.


Finally, the metal handle had no curved grip, and the edges dug into our hands, making it hard to hold. As for heat distribution, while there were no glaring hot or cold spots, we did find that the edges didn't get piping hot.

How We Tested the Frying Pans

How We Tested the Frying Pans

We purchased the top best-selling Japanese frying pans from Japanese websites like Amazon and Yahoo! Shopping and put them all to the test.


We tested each frying pan for the following:

  1. Coating
  2. How well the frying pan conducts heat
  3. How evenly the frying pan distributes heat
  4. How light the frying pan is
  5. How easy it is to hold the handle

For the sake of consistency, all the frying pans we bought were roughly around 26 cm (10.2 in.).

Test ①: Coating

Test ①: Coating

First, we tested how non-stick each pan was. To do this, we cooked eggs with the pan without using any oil to check how non-stick the frying pans were when brand new. 


Then, in order to simulate wear and tear, we rubbed sandpaper onto the center of the pans and then cooked more eggs.

Test ②: Thermal Conductivity

Test ②: Thermal Conductivity

Next, we tested each one for how well each pan conducts heat, since frying pans that quickly get hot are easier to use.


To test this, we poured 600 ml (roughly 2.5 cups) of water into the pans and turned on the heat to check how fast the water would boil.

Test ③ Heat Distribution

Test ③ Heat Distribution

Next, we tested how evenly each pan distributed heat. 


After heating each pan for one minute, we then photographed them with a thermographic camera to check for any hot or cold spots.

Test ④: Lightness

Test ④: Lightness

In this test, we checked how each pan weighed. 


Lighter pans were given higher scores, as lighter pans are usually easier to use.

Test ⑤: How Easy the Handle Was to Hold

Test ⑤: How Easy the Handle Was to Hold

Finally, we checked how easy it was to hold the handles of the pans.


To test for this, we gripped each handle to check whether or not it had uncomfortable edges that dug into our hands as well as how non-slip they were.

Make the Coating on Your Frying Pan Last Longer

Make the Coating on Your Frying Pan Last Longer

It would be sad if after going through all the trouble of buying a frying pan with a superior coating, you find that food is gradually becoming stuck on it over time. However, there are things you can do to make your frying pan last longer!


First, make sure you're being careful with your heat. If the temperature of the pan gets too high, it will damage the coating over time. Steer clear of using too high a heat when cooking and avoid heating it when it's empty.


If you're using a gas stove, turn the heat on so that the flame is just barely touching the bottom of your pan. Also, try and avoid cooling the pan suddenly right after you finish using it.


Be careful not to scratch the surface! Some frying pans allow for use with metal spatulas and some don't so we recommend using a spatula made of either wood or heat-resistant silicon. We also recommend cleaning it with a soft sponge as opposed to something harder like steel wool.


Each frying pan is different when it comes to what to watch out for so be sure to check the package and read through the instruction booklet carefully to get the most out of it and its coating.

Store Your Frying Pan Properly

Store Your Frying Pan Properly

Frying pans with detachable handles can easily be stacked like bowls and stored away but ones without can be a bit more tricky. We recommend partitioning off a part of your drawer or cupboard like in the picture above.


Even if your drawer or cupboard doesn't have its own partitioning, you can easily purchase something like a case or shelf to stick in there, making storage a lot easier.


Also, for those of you with space in your kitchen and who love to show off their cookware, we recommend hanging them either on the wall or above your workspace

How to Make Tamagoyaki with a Round Frying Pan

How to Make Tamagoyaki with a Round Frying Pan

If you want to make tamagoyaki, the Japanese rolled omelet served in sushi restaurants and used in bento lunches, you'll be able to make them even without a special rectangular frying pan. Let's talk about how to do that.


First, pour about half of your egg mixture into the pan and spread it out to the sides making it into a rectangle while still only half-cooked. Then swiftly roll the egg up from the far side of the pan to the near side.

After it's rolled up, place it at the far side of the pan and pour your remaining egg mixture into the near side. Repeat the process from before and you're done! We recommend anyone who loves their rolled omelet to give it a try.

Check Out These Other Great Products!

While in the market for a new frying pan, why not check out other stove-top essentials? Heighten your presence in the kitchen and increase your cooking repertoire!


Also, check out our list for the best spatulas so you can buy one that matches your newly purchased frying pan both in style and in utility!

When you purchase products mentioned in the article, part of the sales may be returned to mybest.
The descriptions of each product is referenced from the content available from the manufacturer, e-commerce sites etc.

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